Fall 2021 On Campus Course Offerings

Please click on the appropriate program below to view available courses and syllabi which will detail the required book list for the course. Please note that it is your responsibility to purchase all materials prior to the start of classes.

Undergraduate

APO 512 – Apologetics
This course introduces the student to the art of fulfilling this biblical mandate to cogently and convincingly explain and defend Christian truth, and focuses on the “what” and “how” of apologetics to present a compelling defense of the Faith. Can also be used for credit in PAS 512.

ENG 181 – Research and Writing
This course is designed to instruct students to plan, research, and write a term paper. Students will be guided through the research phase and given a review of the fundamentals of composition. Extensive use of the library and Internet will be a part of the course.

HIS 101 – Western Civilization I
This course studies the peoples of the Old Testament, the rise and fall of Greek and Roman civilizations, the birth of Christianity, the rise of Islam, the developments in the middle ages, the crusades, the Black Death, the Protestant reformation, and the Catholic counter-reformation.

HIS 200 – American History
This survey course will examine the History of the United States of America from the Age of Exploration to the present era. This breathtaking scope will allow the student to gain a better idea of what values have been formed in America especially surrounding the ideal of freedom and self-governance.

HUM 104 – Humanities in the Early Christian and Medieval World
In this course the emergence and spread of Christianity are viewed as primary cultural phenomena from the time of Christ until the late middle ages. The student is introduced to the major branches of the humanities–for example, the literature, philosophy, arts and architecture as they continue to develop among the civilized peoples of Europe, Asia, and Northern Africa with some emphasis on the culture of Western Europe. An examination of representative ideas and themes, selected texts, and cultural institutions and artifacts provides the data for a cultural overview of the period.

LAT 201 – Latin I
This course is designed to introduce the student to the basics of Latin, with the aim of enabling the student to approach medieval and modern ecclesiastical Latin texts. It is the first of three courses designed to give the student the skills to read modern ecclesiastical Latin. Online and residential.

PAS 325 – Human Formation at the College Level
This course focuses on self-knowledge, formation in Christ and cooperation with the grace of God. To that end, it draws on work on attachment, human development, boundaries, homosexuality, trauma, addiction and the essence of masculinity and femininity. Residential only.

PHH 301 – History of Ancient Philosophy
This course studies the most representative thinkers of ancient philosophy, beginning with Plato, Socrates and Aristotle and ending with St. Augustine and Boethius. Online and residential.

PHS 121 – Logic
This course introduces the basic structures of sound thinking, analytic reading, and the evaluation of arguments, the latter through practice in Aristotelian logic and examination of the three acts of the mind in Aristotelian-Thomistic philosophy.

PHS 421 – Philosophy of Nature
This course explores the fundamental aspects of the natural world knowable to philosophy and science, including a discussion of the methodology and limits of the scientific and philosophical methods.

PHS 490 – Metaphysics
Metaphysics is that most general investigation of philosophy that attempts to arrive at reasoned judgments about how things really are. This course presents a comprehensive introduction to Aristotelian and Thomistic metaphysics. Topics included are the nature of metaphysics as a science and its subject matter; the distinction between being and essence; and the analogy of being.

SAS 451 – Synoptic Gospels
This course explores the stylistic and literary characteristics of Matthew, Mark, and Luke. Students study the Synoptic Gospels’ theological, spiritual, and historical background.

SCM 105 – Nature of Math
This course is required to all undergraduate students, it will introduce the students to different topics in
Mathematics as well as Critical Thinking on how to solve problems.

SCM 301 – Anatomy and Physiology I
This course presents a systemic approach to the study of the human body. Lecture topics include an introduction of anatomical terminology and an overview of cellular processes and tissue classification. Students then learn the gross and microscopic anatomy of the following systems: integumentary, skeletal, and muscular system.

SOC 253 – Political Science
The course surveys ideas in the study of government and politics, examines the perennial questions in political life (Who should rule? and is it good to have power? and Do truth and right change in the course of history?), and explores the various fields of political science.

Graduate

APO 512 – Apologetics
This course introduces the student to the art of fulfilling this biblical mandate to cogently and convincingly explain and defend Christian truth, and focuses on the “what” and “how” of apologetics to present a compelling defense of the Faith. Can also be used for credit in PAS 512.

CLA 715 – Canon Law of Marriage
This course includes a thorough study of the canon law of marriage.

DTH/MTH 642 – John Paul II: Life, Spirituality, and Philosophy
This course will sketch the life, spirituality, and philosophy of Saint John Paul II, as foundational to his teaching and mission as Pope. The course will survey Saint John Paul II’s own poetry, plays, and philosophical works, as well as biographical and autobiographical writings.

DTH 751 – Christology (Pre-Req: DTH 731)
This course considers the person of Jesus Christ and the theology of the Incarnation, with particular attention to the development of Christological doctrine and to the theology of Thomas Aquinas. One & Triune God is a pre-requisite to this course. (Pre-Req: DTH 731)

DTH 890 – Spiritual Theology
This course is a systematic study of Christian holiness based on Sacred Scripture and classical writers considering the virtues and gifts of the Holy Spirit, prayer, spiritual direction, and the stages of the life of grace.

ENG 890 – MA Summative Evaluation: Comprehensive Exam & Professional Paper
This course prepares M.A. Theology students to pass the oral-comprehensive exam in Dogmatic and Moral Theology during Final Exam Week and to write a ten-page professional paper in the student’s concentration. The professional paper will be written under the direction of an advisor and is due the following semester.

MTH 611 – Fundamental Moral I
This course presents fundamental moral principles from the perspective of the classical Catholic moral tradition especially as represented by Thomas Aquinas and John Paul II. Primary questions include the end of man, human acts, moral determinants, freedom, sin, moral responsibility, and conscience.

MTH 612 – Fundamental Moral II
This course examines the nature of moral habit, virtue, and sin with the purpose of preparing priests and religion teachers, spiritual advisors, or other Christians to engage accurately in moral evaluation and formation.

PAS 599 – Parish Management and Operations
This course focuses on developing an effective personal management style that is consistent with all principles of the Catechism of the Catholic Church, best serves the non-sacramental needs of parishioners, affords responsible custodianship of parish assets, and demonstrates best practices in leadership of lay and volunteer personnel.

PAS 671 – Spiritual Direction: Skills and Practice

This course equips the participants with the technical skills for spiritual direction, skills that enable the participants to go through personal discernment and help others in both personal and communitarian discernment for the discovery of personal vocation and decision making.

PHS 610 – Philosophical Anthropology
This course studies human nature from the perspective of the perennial tradition of Catholic philosophy, as well as that of Catholic phenomenological and existential insights.

SAS 643 – Methods and Pentateuch/Historical Books
This course surveys the Pentateuch and the Historical Books in light of commentary from ancient times through modern times while remaining always guided by the Magisterium of the Church. Jesus Christ will be presented as the main key that unlocks the ultimate meaning of the texts being studied.

SAS 651 – Synoptic Gospels
This course explores the stylistic and literary characteristics of Matthew, Mark, and Luke. Students study the Synoptic Gospels’ theological, spiritual, and historical background. ​

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